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Lunar eclipse can you look at it directly

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One of the coincidences of living on Earth at the present time is that the two most prominent astronomical objects, the Sun and the Moon , have nearly the same apparent size in the sky. As a result, the Moon, as seen from Earth, can appear to cover the Sun, producing one of the most impressive events in nature. Figure 1: Solar Eclipse. Notice the dark umbra and the lighter penumbra.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Lunar Eclipse - Why does the moon turn red? - #aumsum #kids #science #education #children

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: A solar eclipse can cook your eyes: How to watch safely

Lunar eclipse guide: When and where to see in the UK

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A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. A lunar eclipse can occur only on the night of a full moon. The type and length of a lunar eclipse depend on the Moon's proximity to either node of its orbit. During a total lunar eclipse, Earth completely blocks direct sunlight from reaching the Moon.

The only light reflected from the lunar surface has been refracted by Earth's atmosphere. This light appears reddish for the same reason that a sunset or sunrise does: the Rayleigh scattering of bluer light.

Due to this reddish color, a totally eclipsed Moon is sometimes called a blood moon. Unlike a solar eclipse , which can only be viewed from a relatively small area of the world, a lunar eclipse may be viewed from anywhere on the night side of Earth. A total lunar eclipse can last up to nearly 2 hours, while a total solar eclipse lasts only up to a few minutes at any given place, due to the smaller size of the Moon's shadow.

Also unlike solar eclipses, lunar eclipses are safe to view without any eye protection or special precautions, as they are dimmer than the full Moon. For the date of the next eclipse, see the section Recent and forthcoming lunar eclipses. Earth's shadow can be divided into two distinctive parts: the umbra and penumbra. Earth totally occludes direct solar radiation within the umbra, the central region of the shadow.

However, since the Sun's diameter appears about one-quarter of Earth's in the lunar sky , the planet only partially blocks direct sunlight within the penumbra, the outer portion of the shadow.

A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through Earth's penumbra. Total penumbral eclipses are rare, and when these occur, the portion of the Moon closest to the umbra may appear slightly darker than the rest of the lunar disk.

A partial lunar eclipse occurs when only a portion of the Moon enters Earth's umbra, while a total lunar eclipse occurs when the entire Moon enters the planet's umbra. The Moon's average orbital speed is about 1. Nevertheless, the total time between the first and the last contacts of the Moon's limb with Earth's shadow is much longer and could last up to four hours.

The relative distance of the Moon from Earth at the time of an eclipse can affect the eclipse's duration. In particular, when the Moon is near apogee , the farthest point from Earth in its orbit , its orbital speed is the slowest. The diameter of Earth's umbra does not decrease appreciably within the changes in the Moon's orbital distance. Thus, the concurrence of a totally eclipsed Moon near apogee will lengthen the duration of totality.

A central lunar eclipse is a total lunar eclipse during which the Moon passes through the centre of Earth's shadow, contacting the antisolar point. This type of lunar eclipse is relatively rare.

A selenelion or selenehelion occurs when both the Sun and an eclipsed Moon can be observed at the same time. This can occur only just before sunset or just after sunrise , when both bodies will appear just above the horizon at nearly opposite points in the sky.

This arrangement has led to the phenomenon being also called a horizontal eclipse. Typically, a number of high ridges undergoing sunrise or sunset can view it. Although the Moon is in Earth's umbra, both the Sun and an eclipsed Moon can be simultaneously seen because atmospheric refraction causes each body to appear higher in the sky than their true geometric positions. The timing of total lunar eclipses are determined by its contacts: [5].

There is often confusion between a solar eclipse and a lunar eclipse. While both involve interactions between the Sun, Earth, and the Moon, they are very different in their interactions. The Moon does not completely darken as it passes through the umbra because of the refraction of sunlight by Earth's atmosphere into the shadow cone; if Earth had no atmosphere, the Moon would be completely dark during the eclipse. Shorter wavelengths are more likely to be scattered by the air molecules and small particles ; thus, the longer wavelengths predominate by the time the light rays have penetrated the atmosphere.

Human vision perceives this resulting light as red. This is the same effect that causes sunsets and sunrises to turn the sky a reddish color. An alternative way of conceiving this scenario is to realize that, as viewed from the Moon, the Sun would appear to be setting or rising behind Earth. The amount of refracted light depends on the amount of dust or clouds in the atmosphere; this also controls how much light is scattered.

In general, the dustier the atmosphere, the more that other wavelengths of light will be removed compared to red light , leaving the resulting light a deeper red color.

This causes the resulting coppery-red hue of the Moon to vary from one eclipse to the next. Volcanoes are notable for expelling large quantities of dust into the atmosphere, and a large eruption shortly before an eclipse can have a large effect on the resulting color.

Several cultures have myths related to lunar eclipses or allude to the lunar eclipse as being a good or bad omen. The Egyptians saw the eclipse as a sow swallowing the Moon for a short time; other cultures view the eclipse as the Moon being swallowed by other animals, such as a jaguar in Mayan tradition, or a three legged toad in China.

Some societies thought it was a demon swallowing the Moon, and that they could chase it away by throwing stones and curses at it. Similarly to the Mayans, the Incans believed that lunar eclipses occurred when a jaguar would eat the Moon, which is why a blood moon looks red. The Incans also believed that once the jaguar finished eating the Moon, it could come down and devour all the animals on Earth, so they would take spears and shout at the Moon to keep it away.

The ancient Mesopotamians believed that a lunar eclipse was when the Moon was being attacked by seven demons. This attack was more than just one on the Moon, however, for the Mesopotamians linked what happened in the sky with what happened on the land, and because the king of Mesopotamia represented the land, the seven demons were thought to be also attacking the king.

In order to prevent this attack on the king, the Mesopotamians made someone pretend to be the king so they would be attacked instead of the true king. After the lunar eclipse was over, the substitute king was made to disappear possibly by poisoning.

In some Chinese cultures, people would ring bells to prevent a dragon or other wild animals from biting the Moon. Certain lunar eclipses have been referred to as "blood moons" in popular articles but this is not a scientifically-recognized term.

The first, and simpler, meaning relates to the reddish color a totally eclipsed Moon takes on to observers on Earth. The second meaning of "blood moon" has been derived from this apparent coloration by two fundamentalist Christian pastors, Mark Blitz and John Hagee. At least two lunar eclipses and as many as five occur every year, although total lunar eclipses are significantly less common. If the date and time of an eclipse is known, the occurrences of upcoming eclipses are predictable using an eclipse cycle , like the saros.

Eclipses occur only during an eclipse season , when the Sun appears to pass near either node of the Moon's orbit. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. When the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. For other uses, see Lunar eclipse disambiguation. See also: Blood moon prophecy. See also: Saros astronomy and Eclipse cycle. Main article: List of 21st-century lunar eclipses.

Further information: Lists of lunar eclipses. Astronomy portal Solar System portal. Retrieved August 1, Mucke, J. Meeus Fundamental Astronomy.

Archived from the original on Retrieved Inconstant Moon. Cyclopedia Selenica. Retrieved 19 December July 16, The troposphere and stratosphere act together as a ring-shaped lens that refracts heavily reddened sunlight into Earth's umbral shadow.

Totality Eclipses of the Sun 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press. University of Maryland. Retrieved 2 October Yahoo News. National Geographic. Retrieved 9 October LA Times. Retrieved 6 October What is a Blood Moon? Christian Science Monitor.

Retrieved 8 February Globe Pequot. Retrieved 30 May Washington Post. Religion News Service. European Southern Observatory. Retrieved 14 August Lunar eclipse at Wikipedia's sister projects. The Moon. Category Commons WikiProject. Lunar eclipses.

Can You Look at a Lunar Eclipse? How to Safely Watch on January 31

Read our important medical disclaimer. I have a science project and have decided to focus on the eye in relation to solar and lunar eclipses. Why is it that you can look at a lunar eclipse with the bare eye but not the solar eclipse? In a lunar eclipse, the earth passes between the sun and the moon; making the moon invisible to an observer on earth because there are no light rays reflected off the moon. Even when looking at the moon immediately before or after the eclipse, the reflected light off the moon does not have the same potential for damage as during a solar eclipse.

Four lunar eclipses will appear across Earth's skies in They will all be penumbral eclipses, which means the face of the moon will appear to turn a darker silver color for a few hours. Weather permitting, people across most locations on our planet will catch at least one of the lunar eclipses falling on Jan.

But what exactly is a penumbral lunar eclipse and is it safe to look at? Here's all you need to know. In a penumbral lunar eclipse only the outer shadow of the Earth, which is called the penumbra, falls on the earth's face. It's not the most obvious eclipse as it's quite hard to spot, unlike a total eclipse which can turn the entire moon red.

What is a penumbral lunar eclipse and is it safe to look directly at it?

The third of will happen March As a result, there are two distance extremes of each orbit: closest approach, known as perigee, and the farthest, or apogee. When the Moon is at closest approach and within a day or so of being full, it is called a supermoon because the Moon will be at its brightest and largest. For the supermoon on Feb. A supermoon also occurred in January with a slightly more distant perigee, a mere miles kilometers farther away, but 14 hours after the full Moon. The third and last supermoon of the year will happen March 19, when the perigee distance will be reached a day and five hours before the full Moon see the table below for details. The Moon will look extremely large when it rises and sets. Because these relatively close objects are in front of the Moon, our brain is tricked into thinking the Moon is much closer to the objects that are in our line of sight. At Moon rise or set, it only appears larger than when it is directly overhead because there are no nearby objects with which to compare it. You can check this.

Lunar eclipse guide: What they are, when to see them and where

A total solar eclipse is one of the most awe-inspiring events in nature, but astronomers and ophthalmologists warn that looking at the sun without solar eclipse glasses or other protection can damage your eyes and cause permanent blindness. Totality, the brief period when the moon completely covers the sun, is the only safe time to watch with the naked eye. Lasting from seconds to a maximum of 7. The sun is basically a huge, continuous thermonuclear explosion, which produces intense radiation across the spectrum from infrared to ultraviolet light and beyond. Infrared light is absorbed by many materials and is readily converted to heat, while ultraviolet light is the source of sunburn.

You could be forgiven for thinking that America is suddenly experiencing lots of eclipses, but what will happen in the early hours of January 31 will be nothing like August's total solar eclipse in the U.

A lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. A lunar eclipse can occur only on the night of a full moon. The type and length of a lunar eclipse depend on the Moon's proximity to either node of its orbit.

Lunar eclipse

The first thing to remember about observing an eclipse is safety. A solar eclipse is potentially dangerous, however, because viewing a solar eclipse involves looking at the Sun, which can damage your eyesight. A solar eclipse can be viewed safely with the naked eye only during the few brief seconds or minutes of a total solar eclipse , when the Sun itself is completely obscured by the Moon.

Lunar eclipses are some of the most easy-to-watch astronomical events. All you need to see them are clear skies and a pair of eyes. Anyone on the night-side of the Earth at the time of the eclipse can see it. Viewing a lunar eclipse, whether it is a partial , penumbral or total eclipse of the Moon, requires little effort. All you need is a clear view of the Moon and the Sky, clothes to keep your warm at night, and a chair so that you can be comfortable while watching the eclipse. While you don't need any special equipment for viewing a lunar eclipse, astronomers and veteran photographers recommend some things that can make your lunar eclipse viewing experience even better.

The What: Eye Safety

A partial lunar eclipse could be visible from the UK on Tuesday 16 July. An eclipse of the Moon occurs when the Earth lies directly between the Sun and the Moon and the Moon lies in the shadow of the Earth. For a total lunar eclipse to happen, all three are in a straight line. This means that the Moon passes through the darkest part of the Earth's shadow. A full lunar eclipse is often called a blood moon because the Moon becomes a bright reddish colour. A partial lunar eclipse is when part of the Moon travels through the Earth's full 'umbral' shadow.

During a lunar eclipse, the Earth comes between the path of the Moon and the Sun and casts a shadow on its Jul 16, - Uploaded by IndianExpressOnline.

But the eclipse will not peak until after 7pm GMT, when the lunar orb is closest to the centre of the shadow. Staring directly at a solar eclipse without certified filter glasses can be incredibly damaging to your eyes. Even when the Sun is shrouded by the Moon and the skies are deceptively dark, radiation from the Sun can still hit your eyes. Lunar eclipses, on the other hand, are completely safe to look at because the Moon does not glow with its own light.

A partial lunar eclipse occurs when the Earth moves between the Sun and Moon but the they don't form a straight line in space. A small part of the Moon's surface is covered by the darkest, central part of the Earth's shadow, called the umbra. The rest of the Moon is covered by the outer part of the Earth's shadow called the penumbra.

Find out what a lunar eclipse is and when the next total lunar eclipse in the UK will occur, as well as expert tips on how to see it from astronomers at the Royal Observatory Greenwich. An eclipse of the Moon occurs when the Earth lies directly between the Sun and the Moon and the Moon lies in the shadow of the Earth. For a total lunar eclipse to happen, all three bodies lie in a straight line.

When Earth casts its shadow on the Moon it can cause quite a spectacle. Find out how often these events occur, and where you can view them from over the next ten years.

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