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Find command man pages

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The online Reference Manual man pages provide detailed descriptions and usage of the commands. You can use the man command to display the man page entry that explains a given command. The syntax of the man command is as follows. The online man page entries are organized into sections based on the type or usage of the command or file. For example, Section 1 contains user commands, and Section 4 contains information about various file formats. To look up a specific section of the man page, use the man command with the -s option, followed by the section number, and the command or file name.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Linux Command Line: Getting Help and The Man Pages

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Linux Commands Tutorial - Man pages, apropos & locate

Navigating man pages in Linux

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For example, you can use the man command to help identify commands to handle some unusually challenging task or to show options that can help you use a command you already know in new and better ways. The man command can help you find commands by topic. The man command is simply matching words in the command description, acting very much like the apropos command.

Notice the numbers in parentheses after each command listed above. These relate to the man page sections that contain the commands. The man command sections divide the commands into categories. As you can see from the above descriptions, they cover system calls, library calls, special files and more.

The listing below shows where man pages are actually stored on Linux systems. The dates on these directories will vary because, with updates, some of these sections will get new content while others will not.

Note that the man page files are generally gzipped to save space. The man command unzips them as needed whenever you use the man command. Even just looking at the first 10 man pages in Section 1 as shown above , you are likely to see some commands that are new to you — maybe a2query or aaflip shown above. An even better strategy for exploring commands is to list commands by section without looking at the files themselves but, instead, using a man command that shows you the commands and provides a brief description of each.

The -k. The exact number may vary, but most Linux systems will have a similar number of commands. If we use a command that adds these numbers together, we can see that the system that this command is running on has nearly 7, man pages. Sandra Henry-Stocker has been administering Unix systems for more than 30 years.

She describes herself as "USL" Unix as a second language but remembers enough English to write books and buy groceries. She lives in the mountains in Virginia where, when not working with or writing about Unix, she's chasing the bears away from her bird feeders. Here are the latest Insider stories. More Insider Sign Out. Sign In Register. Sign Out Sign In Register. Latest Insider. Check out the latest Insider stories here. More from the IDG Network.

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find(1) - Linux man page

The find utility recursively descends the directory hierarchy for each path seeking files that match a Boolean expression written in the primaries specified below. Causes the file information and file type evaluated for each symbolic link encountered on the command line to be those of the file referenced by the link, and not the link itself. If the referenced file does not exist, the file information and type is for the link itself.

Search a folder hierarchy for filename s that meet a desired criteria: Name, Size, File Type - see examples. GNU find searches the directory tree rooted at each given file name by evaluating the given expression from left to right, according to the rules of precedence see Operators , until the outcome is known the left hand side is false for AND operations, true for OR , at which point find moves on to the next file name.

On Unix-like operating systems, the find command searches for files and directories in a file system. Within each directory tree specified by the given path s, it evaluates the given expression from left to right, according to the rules of precedence see " Operators ", below until the outcome is known. At that point find moves on to the next path until all path s have been searched. It can be used on its own to locate files, or in conjunction with other programs to perform operations on those files.

find(1) [v7 man page]

Jump to navigation. It's easy to get into the habit of googling anything you want to know about a command or operation in Linux, but I'd argue there's something even better: a living and breathing, complete reference, the man pages , which is short for manual pages. The history of man pages predates Linux, all the way back to the early days of Unix. Man pages also have a reputation of being terse and, in a way, have a language of their own. Just like Unix and Linux, the man pages have not been static, and they continue to be developed and maintained just like the kernel. Even so, users generally don't need to know the section where a particular command lies to find what they need. The files are formatted in a way that may look odd to many users today. Originally, they were written in in an old form of markup called troff because they were designed to be printed through a PostScript printer, so they included formatting for headers and other layout aspects.

Finding Files

While they're not all well-advertised, there are actually a variety of means of getting help under Unix. Man pages correspond to online manuals for programs, file formats, functions, system calls, and so forth. If you've never read one before, the best way to start is by typing 'man man ' at the command line. Of course, while man pages are a vast improvement over the online documentation of most other OSes, they suffer from many failings: some people don't like to read text on the screen not very helpful unless you already know what to look for not always accessible even when present not always present, especially under Linux frequently hard to read, as they try to be authoritative and are therefore often too technical for new users frequently out of date That said, they're still better and more comprehensive than the alternatives.

For example, you can use the man command to help identify commands to handle some unusually challenging task or to show options that can help you use a command you already know in new and better ways.

Command line users are undoubtedly familiar with man pages, or manual pages, that contain details, help , and documentation to specified commands and functions. Referencing a man page can be essential when trying to learn proper syntax or how a command works, but with how large some manual pages are it can be a real drag to scroll through the entire man page to try and find a relevant portion. Note the flag is a capital -K, the string can be anything.

How to Search Man Pages at the Command Line

The man command provides reference information on topics, such as commands, subroutines, and files. The man command provides one-line descriptions of commands specified by name. The man command also provides information on all commands whose descriptions contain a set of user-specified keywords. The man command formats a specified set of manual pages.

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. Pay attention to the section number: Suppose you want help on printf. The bash version of printf is in section 1, the C version is in section 3 or 3C. If you don't know which one you want, type man -a printf , and all manual pages will be displayed.

How to effectively use Man Pages under Linux

This file documents the GNU utilities for finding files that match certain criteria and performing various operations on them. This file documents the GNU utilities for finding files that match certain criteria and performing various actions on them. This manual shows how to find files that meet criteria you specify, and how to perform various actions on the files that you find. The principal programs that you use to perform these tasks are find , locate , and xargs. Some of the examples in this manual use capabilities specific to the GNU versions of those programs.

You can use the man command to display the man page entry that explains a given titled 'SEE ALSO', lists other commands or files related to the man page.

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