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Homily on the woman at the well

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Woman At The Well - Billy Graham

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Story of The Samaritan Woman at the Well Explained

In Truth and Charity: The woman at the well

He comes to the well of their mutual father Jacob in the middle of the day — at the sixth hour, that is, at the height of noon — when the sun is at its highest in the sky and the day is at its hottest and brightest point.

Many have suggested that this Samaritan woman chooses this time to come to the well, in all this heat and brightness, because of a darkness in her life. That is, she comes at noon because no one else comes at noon. We can understand that a woman who had gone through five husbands and was now living with a man not her husband was perhaps outcast among the women of her community.

And so she wants to avoid them. Small wonder. Better the staring eye of the noonday sun than the scornful eye of an enemy. So to keep herself in the dark, she comes to the well in the light and finds sitting there by the well the one who is light himself, weary from his journey and asking her for water.

They speak of water and eternal life, of Samaritans and Jews, and of worship. Jesus reveals to her the true worship, which is worship in spirit and truth. He shines his light into her life. Trying to hide, she finds herself exposed — but not exposed by her judgmental rivals — rather, exposed to the light by her merciful and loving Lord.

Sin festers in the dark and dies in the light. We are healed from sin, which is really a disease, by exposing in to the light. This is why confession is a sacrament of healing. Truly, Jesus is the physician of our souls and bodies.

And today, he heals the Samaritan woman by drawing the poison of her secret sin out into the light. Nonetheless, when Jesus exposes the true meaning of her words to her she recognizes and admits the truth of them by confessing that Jesus is a prophet , that is, that his words of the words of God and are the truth. How can she, an outcast, go among those who have despised her to preach the gospel? But that is what she does.

Like the apostles who leave their nets when they are called by Jesus, she leaves behind her water jar to go and preach the gospel to the whole city.

She is no longer afraid of what other people think of her. But she is freed from her fear of that judgment. She leaves that fear behind with her water jar at the well, because she has been freed from the darkness in her life by the light of the world, and no worldly power can stop the power of her God-given conviction.

And so through her, many come to believe. She brings many into the light — to Christ — because Jesus is the light. She is like the first evangelist, bringing people to Christ even before he dies and rises from the dead. By tradition, we know that she was baptized and brought her five sisters and her two sons into the faith and they all continued to evangelize. After the martyrdom of Peter and Paul, she and her family traveled to Carthage to preach the gospel there until they, too, were martyred.

And we also know the name she received in her baptism: Photini, the enlightened one, for she received the light of Christ and let it shine before all with neither fear nor shame again until the end of her life. In some ways, Photini is the quintessential baptismal name. Some of the fathers of the Church regarded all the mysteries of initiation into the Church and into the body of Christ — baptism, chrismation, and eucharist — to be a single mystery, which they name illumination or enlightenment.

The one thus received is therefore Photini and Photini becomes for us all an image of our baptism. Like Photini, we are all subject to death in our sins when Christ encounters us at the well, or at the font of our baptism, through which he shines his light into our darkness and illumines us.

May we all, like Photini, having been filled with grace through the holy mysteries, live out our whole lives with evangelical fervor. John R. He has an M. Finding God in the Mess. An Old Prayer for New Times. Ask Mary. Catholic Exchange is a project of Sophia Institute Press. Email Login. Catholic Exchange. Jesus shines his light into the life of the Samaritan woman. By Fr. Russell Fr. Subscribe to CE It's free. Dan Burke 2 months ago. Most Shared. All rights reserved.

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Sunday Homily - Woman at the Well

The Gospel today is the story of the woman at the well. She was not only a woman, who was basically treated as lower in rank than the men, but also a sinner. But, more so than a woman and a sinner, she was a Samaritan. She represents those who were treated as strangers or foreigners, marginalized, despised, discriminated against in Jewish society during Jesus times. Jesus reached out to them.

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John Jesus left Judea and started back to Galilee. Oh, Samaria! That was the strange place, the half-breed place, the place you are not supposed to visit if you are well brought up! All of us had some section of town when we were growing up that we were not supposed to visit. Two thousand years ago, that place was Samaria!

The Samaritan Woman & Our Call to Evangelization

From a talk given at St. Jesus came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of land that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jesus, tired from his journey, sat down there at the well. It was about noon. A woman of Samaria came to draw water. His disciples had gone into the town to buy food. Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us this cistern and drank from it himself with his children and his flocks? What you have said is true.

Homily for the Sunday of the Woman at the Well

This Gospel of the woman at the well is really about Evangelization. Jesus shares with the woman at the well - the goodness of a life of Grace and she responds. Jesus shows us that we too can follow a similiar way to help others understand the good news of Jesus Christ. We too are called to evangelize. When I went to Canada to spread the gospel of Jesus with the youth up there, we looked for every opportunity to talk about Jesus Christ.

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls.

Having Jesus in the center of our lives makes our whole life better. Every day is better with Jesus in the center. When we have Jesus where he belongs our whole life just falls into place.

The Courage to Face the Truth: Homily for the Sunday of the Samaritan Woman in the Orthodox Church

Sounds painful knees! But during Lent we are all called to do the same are we not? The first reading is from the Book of Exodus after God had set His people free from slavery in Egypt and after Moses had parted the Red Sea with his staff. Yet after all they had witnessed the people were complaining because they were thirsty.

He comes to the well of their mutual father Jacob in the middle of the day — at the sixth hour, that is, at the height of noon — when the sun is at its highest in the sky and the day is at its hottest and brightest point. Many have suggested that this Samaritan woman chooses this time to come to the well, in all this heat and brightness, because of a darkness in her life. That is, she comes at noon because no one else comes at noon. We can understand that a woman who had gone through five husbands and was now living with a man not her husband was perhaps outcast among the women of her community. And so she wants to avoid them. Small wonder.

In Truth and Charity: The woman at the well

It is strangely appealing to define ourselves by our failures, especially when others know that we have stumbled and treat us poorly as a result. As well, our own pride often causes us to lose perspective such that we obsess about how we do not measure up to whatever illusion of perfection we have accepted. People are often their own harshest critics in ways that are not healthy at all. He rises in glory not only over the tomb and Hades, but over all the distortions of the beauty of the human person created in His image and likeness. Today we commemorate that His salvation extends to our most painful failings and to the harsh judgments of others upon us.

Sunday Homily - Woman at the Well. March 11, by Fr. Jason Cargo. This Gospel of the woman at the well is really about Evangelization. Jesus shares with.

By Dr. Philip W. McLarty The story of the woman at the well is familiar to most churchgoers. I had the privilege of studying the Gospel of John in seminary with Dr.

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