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How to get a guy to like you more

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Updated: April 22, References. Do you want a guy to be completely crazy about you , the way you are about him? While you can't force someone to feel a certain way, you can definitely put your best foot forward and give his feelings a chance to develop. Here are some helpful hints on how to charm a guy, while still being true to yourself. To get a guy to like you, start by talking to him. Don't just admire him from afar.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: HOW TO FLIRT WITH YOUR CRUSH: HOW TO GET HIM/HER TO LIKE YOU

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How to Get a Guy to Like You

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Maybe it's their goofy smile; maybe it's their razor-sharp wit; or maybe it's simply that they're easy to be around. You just like them. But scientists generally aren't satisfied with answers like that, and they've spent years trying to pinpoint the exact factors that draw one person to another.

Below, we've rounded up some of their most intriguing findings. Read on for insights that will cast your current friendships in a new light — and will help you form better relationships, faster. This strategy is called mirroring, and involves subtly mimicking another person's behavior. When talking to someone, try copying their body language, gestures, and facial expressions. In , New York University researchers documented the "chameleon effect," which occurs when people unconsciously mimic each other's behavior.

That mimicry facilitates liking. Researchers had 72 men and women work on a task with a partner. The partners who worked for the researchers either mimicked the other participant's behavior or didn't, while researchers videotaped the interactions. At the end of the interaction, the researchers had participants indicate how much they liked their partners. Sure enough, participants were more likely to say that they liked their partner when their partner had been mimicking their behavior.

According to the mere-exposure effect, people tend to like other people who are familiar to them. In one example of this phenomenon, psychologists at the University of Pittsburgh had four women pose as students in a university psychology class.

Each woman showed up in class a different number of times. When experimenters showed male students pictures of the four women, the men demonstrated a greater affinity for those women they'd seen more often in class — even though they hadn't interacted with any of them.

People will associate the adjectives you use to describe other people with your personality. This phenomenon is called spontaneous trait transference. One study published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology found that this effect occurred even when people knew certain traits didn't describe the people who had talked about them.

According to Gretchen Rubin, author of the book "The Happiness Project," "whatever you say about other people influences how people see you. If you describe someone else as genuine and kind, people will also associate you with those qualities. The reverse is also true: If you are constantly trashing people behind their backs, your friends will start to associate the negative qualities with you as well.

Emotional contagion describes what happens when people are strongly influenced by the moods of other people. According to a research paper from the Ohio University and the University of Hawaii, people can unconsciously feel the emotions of those around them.

The authors of the paper say that's possibly because we naturally mimic others' movements and facial expressions, which in turn makes us feel something similar to what they're feeling. If you want to make others feel happy when they're around you, do your best to communicate positive emotions. Princeton University psychologists and their colleagues proposed the stereotype content model, which is a theory that people judge others based on their warmth and competence.

According to the model, if you can portray yourself as warm — i. If you seem competent — for example, if you have high economic or educational status — they're more inclined to respect you. Harvard psychologist Amy Cuddy says it's important to demonstrate warmth first and then competence, especially in business settings. According to the pratfall effect, people will like you more after you make a mistake — but only if they believe you are a competent person.

Revealing that you aren't perfect makes you more relatable and vulnerable toward the people around you. Researcher Elliot Aronson at the University of Texas, Austin first discovered this phenomenon when he studied how simple mistakes can affect perceived attraction.

He asked male students from the University of Minnesota to listen to tape recordings of people taking a quiz. When people did well on the quiz but spilled coffee at the end of the interview, the students rated them higher on likability than when they did well on the quiz and didn't spill coffee or didn't do well on the quiz and spilled coffee.

According to a classic study by Theodore Newcomb, people are more attracted to those who are similar to them. This is known as the similarity-attraction effect. In his experiment, Newcomb measured his subjects' attitudes on controversial topics, such as sex and politics, and then put them in a University of Michigan-owned house to live together.

By the end of their stay, the subjects liked their housemates more when they had similar attitudes about the topics measured. Interestingly, a more recent study from researchers at the University of Virginia and Washington University in St.

Louis found that Air Force recruits liked each other more when they had similar negative personality traits than when they shared positive ones. Subliminal touching occurs when you touch a person so subtly that they barely notice.

Common examples include tapping someone's back or touching their arm, which can make them feel more warmly toward you. In a French study, young men stood on street corners and talked to women who walked by. The men had double the success rate in striking up a conversation when they lightly touched the woman's arms as they talked to them instead of doing nothing at all. A University of Mississippi and Rhodes College experiment studied the effects of interpersonal touch on restaurant tipping, and had some waitresses briefly touch customers on the hand or shoulder as they were returning their change.

As it turns out, those waitresses earned significantly larger tips than the ones who didn't touch their customers. In one University of Wyoming study, nearly undergraduate women looked at photos of another woman in one of four poses: smiling in an open-body position, smiling in a closed-body position, not smiling in an open-body position, or not smiling in a closed-body position.

Results suggested that the woman in the photo was liked most when she was smiling, regardless of her body position. More recently, researchers at Stanford University and the University of Duisburg-Essen found that students who interacted with each other through avatars felt more positively about the interaction when the avatar displayed a bigger smile.

Bonus: Another study suggested that smiling when you first meet someone helps ensure they'll remember you later. People want to be perceived in a way that aligns with their own beliefs about themselves.

This phenomenon is described by self-verification theory. We all seek confirmations of our views, positive or negative. For a series of studies at Stanford University and the University of Arizona, participants with positive and negative perceptions of themselves were asked whether they wanted to interact with people who had positive or negative impressions of them.

The participants with positive self-views preferred people who thought highly of them, while those with negative self-views preferred critics. This could be because people like to interact with those who provide feedback consistent with their known identity. Other research suggests that when people's beliefs about us line up with our own, our relationship with them flows more smoothly.

That's likely because we feel understood, which is an important component of intimacy. Experimenters provided some student pairs with a series of questions to ask, which got increasingly deep and personal.

For example, one of the intermediate questions was "How do you feel about your relationship with your mother? For example, one question was "What is your favorite holiday? At the end of the experiment, the students who'd asked increasingly personal questions reported feeling much closer to each other than students who'd engaged in small talk. You can try this technique on your own as you're getting to know someone. For example, you can build up from asking easy questions like the last movie they saw to learning about the people who mean the most to them in life.

When you share intimate information with another person, they are more likely to feel closer to you and want to confide in you in the future. Two experiments led by researchers at the University of Florida, Arizona State University, and Singapore Management University found that people place a high value on both trustworthiness and trustingness in their relationships.

Those two traits proved especially important when people were imagining their ideal friend and ideal employee. Research from Illinois State University and California State University at Los Angeles found that, regardless of whether people were thinking about their ideal friend or romantic partner, a sense of humor was really important.

Another study from researchers at DePaul University and Illinois State University found that using humor when you're first getting to know someone can make the person like you more. In fact, the study suggested that participating in a humorous task like having someone wear a blindfold while the other person teaches them a dance can increase romantic attraction. Harvard researchers recently discovered that talking about yourself may be inherently rewarding, the same way that food, money, and sex are.

In one study, the researchers had participants sit in an fMRI machine and respond to questions about either their own opinions or someone else's.

Participants had been asked to bring a friend or family member to the experiment, who was sitting outside the fMRI machine. In some cases, participants were told that their responses would be shared with the friend or relative; in other cases, their responses would be kept private. Results showed that the brain regions associated with motivation and reward were most active when participants were sharing information publicly — but also were active when they were talking about themselves without anyone listening.

In other words, letting someone share a story or two about their life instead of blabbing about yours could give them more positive memories of your interaction. Writing on PsychologyToday. It might be worth the risk — the same Illinois State University and California State University at Los Angeles study cited above found that expressiveness and openness are desirable and important traits in ideal companions.

Psychologists have known for a while about a phenomenon called "reciprocity of liking": When we think someone likes us, we tend to like them as well. In one study published in Human Relations, for example, participants were told that certain members of a group discussion would probably like them. These group members were chosen randomly by the experimenter.

After the discussion, participants indicated that the people they liked best were the ones who supposedly liked them. More recently, researchers at the University of Waterloo and the University of Manitoba found that when we expect people to accept us, we act warmer toward them — thereby increasing the chances that they really will like us. So even if you're not sure how a person you're interacting with feels about you, act like you like them and they'll probably like you back.

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How To Make a Man Fall in Love With You: 17 Tips He Won’t Resist

You might be intimidated by the fact that boys and girls speak entirely different languages. This is something that this article is going to try to help you out with. You might not know this, but it needs to be said. Making your man do some work for you is going to make him like you.

Honestly, we should all bow down to Hailey Baldwin. So, how did she turn a crush into the real thing? Here's everything you need to know to get your crush to like you back.

Fresh perspective on dating issues compiled in consultation with friends in North America, Australia and African nations. Want to make a man fall in love with you forever? You might be asking this question because you like a guy very much and you are looking forward to him feeling the same for you. He's the man of your dreams, and you adore him. You're willing to do whatever it takes for him to chase you, like you, get attracted to you and fall madly in love with you but it seems like a huge undertaking.

How to Get a Guy to Like You Effortlessly, In No Time!

Let's face it, men can be hard to read. It's important to avoid playing mind games, but if there's a guy you're eyeing, there are ways catch his attention. Here are some tips and tricks from relationship and matchmaking experts that can help you get a man to focus his attention on you. A man is going to notice a woman who is having a good time and relaxing. Stay away from hiding yourself in the corner, with furniture or plants. It's important to find something useful to do wherever you are whether it's chiming in on a group conversation or deftly maneuvering your way to the bar because guys will notice you're being active, and not trying to play hide and seek. As s as this sounds, men really like being helpful. Open up about a challenging situation at work or ask him for an app recommendation. Talk about little things you do, like keeping fresh flowers at home, doing yoga, reading a book every week, or getting a good night's sleep, said Emily Holmes Hahn, founder of LastFirst bespoke matchmaking club. They might seem insignificant, but any sign of a "centered and balanced lifestyle" is encouraging, she said.

What men find sexy: Simple ways to get him to notice you

Maybe you have a huge crush on him and you want him to want you back. When you put this list into action in your life, it will definitely give you the best chance of snaring his attention and desire. That you love talking about. That you could talk to anyone for hours and hours on.

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Whether you're trying to hook a new guy or just want to make the dude you're seeing slightly obsessed with you, bust out these tips and he won't stand a chance. Before going out, primp until you've tapped into your inner Kate Upton. When you're looking and feeling your best, guys will sense that uberconfidence, which is practically catnip to men.

How to Make a Man Fall Madly in Love With You: 13 Tips on Making a Guy Like You

The guide below includes 34 ideas to help you stand out to attractive guys. It all started when I learned about a little-known aspect of male psychology, which affects how men feel about the women in their life. This skill can make all the difference to relationships.

So you want to know how to get a guy to like you, how to be more interesting and appealing to the opposite sex. Most of the information out there on this topic is horribly misguided. It tells you to hide interest, to play games, to make him chase you. Where did we get the idea that men want aloof women who play hard to get? Here is a key thing to understand about men: men move toward what feels good. Try to remember this when you are interacting with the guy you like.

Do This To Make Him Like You: 11 Ways To Get A Guy To Like You

Maybe it's their goofy smile; maybe it's their razor-sharp wit; or maybe it's simply that they're easy to be around. You just like them. But scientists generally aren't satisfied with answers like that, and they've spent years trying to pinpoint the exact factors that draw one person to another. Below, we've rounded up some of their most intriguing findings. Read on for insights that will cast your current friendships in a new light — and will help you form better relationships, faster. This strategy is called mirroring, and involves subtly mimicking another person's behavior. When talking to someone, try copying their body language, gestures, and facial expressions. In , New York University researchers documented the "chameleon effect," which occurs when people unconsciously mimic each other's behavior.

Topics: How to Get a GUY to Like you, How to get a boy to like you, how to get his attention, how to get Mar 30, - Uploaded by Ask Kimberly.

There has to be a spark of interest there at first, but how deep someone falls in love with you will often be a result of the effort you both put forth to make that feeling happen. Though you can never force a person to like you and should never try, even if you could , there are definitely some psychology-based dating tips and methods that can help you learn how to get a guy to like you — and make people think of you more highly in general. Studies have shown that people tend to like people who they do favors for , even if they initially hated them. This is because we subconsciously make ourselves believe that the person would do the same for us as we did for them.

How To Get A Guy To Like You: 50 Proven Ways

The real secret behind knowing how to get a guy to like you is exceedingly simple. What do you do when you like a guy and want him to like you back? You drop a few hints and bat your eyelid at him. And big chances are, it works most of the time.

How To *Actually* Get Your Crush To Like You Back

My name is Adam LoDolce, and I have helped thousands of women find true love. Before we get started, let me just say something about patience. Does he love you?

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How To Make A Man Obsessed With You

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Comments: 5
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