Site Logo
Looking for girlfriend > Looking for a friend > Male daughters female husband

Male daughters female husband

You may purchase this title at these fine bookstores. Outside the USA, see our international sales information. University of Chicago Press: E. About Contact News Giving to the Press. Transformative Learning Edmund O'Sullivan. Pluralist Economics Edward Fullbrook.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 'My Husband Has Now Become My Wife' - This Morning

Content:
SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Husband's Transformation Into a Woman

Male Daughters, Female Husbands: Gender and Sex in an African Society – Review

Ifi Amadiume. London: Zed Publications, Exploring the transposition of Western mores onto West African society, Amadiume outlines a new gender reality brought on by the imposition of European Christian values on a traditionally matrilineal society. The book is based on fieldwork conducted by Amadiune in Nnobi—the Igbo area where the author hails from—in the s.

As such Amadiune was not considered a stranger or outside researcher, allowing her to conduct a revealing amount of work. Her fieldwork consisted of interviews with women, out of which she constructs a systematic description of the history and social problems of the area. In particular, she suggests the initiation of debates on religion to reveal to women the positive and powerful roles in which women have played in various religions in order to arm them against those who would use religion against them.

To support her thesis, Amadiume seeks to reevaluate the importance of matriarchy. She shows that gender ideologies behind sexual division of labour in Igbo society stem from their myths of origin. Yet, the goddess Idemili, the central religious deity, encouraged industriousness: the title of Ekwe was bestowed ritually upon women who created wealth through the control of others.

One way was through igba ohu, woman-to-woman marriage. Powerful and assertive women were also able to dominate their husbands and not be stigmatized for it, since gender was understood as separate from biological sex. While patriarchal beliefs and a male ancestor cult existed, the goddess cult legitimized women becoming husbands in relation to their male partners— and consequently male themselves.

It was not matriarchy that allowed for female power, contrary to popular beliefs about non-Western, non-patriarchal societies.

Rather, it was a dual-gender system that celebrates typical ideals of femininity and motherhood, but in which gender realities are not necessarily fixed. Whereas indigenous concepts were flexible in terms of gender and power, the new Western concepts were not. Consequently, all activities associated with the goddess were banned in the colonial period and women took on more passive social roles upheld by the Bible.

The biblical story of creation, for example, was cited as proof of the necessity for the new and preferred power dynamic. Churchwomen could not see themselves as possible clergy members, and exclusion from politics and from the economy became acceptable in terms of Church law. Christianity not only condemned the goddess, but also banned the associated Ekwe title, effectively shattering symbols of female self-esteem and economic incentive.

Today, the Ekwe title continues to be felt as contrary to the teachings of the Church. Indigenous gender institutions were condemned as pagan and anti-Christian and have been abandoned or reinterpreted to the detriment of women.

Interpreted according to canon law and Christian morality—which sets out acceptable forms of marriage and equates marriage with sexuality—the institution of woman-to-woman marriage, a practice that had allowed women to accumulate wealth, was forbidden. Subordination is, as Amadiume shows, not the result of imposed domestic and maternal roles, which were valued in the pre-colonial period.

Instead, it is the result of gender inflexibility and the eradication of the magico-religious means by which women gained and maintained a title allowing them control.

Islam, for instance, spread through modern West Africa faster under colonial rule in six decades than it had during the thousand years preceding European occupation and domination—for this to be the case, there is surely a relationship developing between gender, religion, and contemporary society that needs to be explored. This has been the case across Muslim West Africa after independence and throughout the religious revival.

Dakar in particular has seen the emergence of female marabouts people well-versed in esoteric Islamic knowledge and practice who are navigating this male-dominated domain. Of course, as women, they face problems in legitimatizing their work. Amber Gemmeke asserts that they are solving these by presenting themselves as possessing traits normally ascribed to male practitioners.

Furthermore, elsewhere in West Africa, Gemmeke asserts that the increasing access that women have had to Islamic education since has led to an ever-growing number of female preachers and female religious scholars. The relationship between Western religion and female agency is also relevant outside of Nnobi. According to Amadiume, in Muslim communities in the Northern states women have formed formal organizations.

However, instead of the secular approach that the state had expected, argumentation has been taken over by points referring to Islam. It would appear that discussing the code in terms of Islam legitimizes it in the eyes of many, and that associations of women are carrying out this important work.

Of course, there is a long way to go—data has been shown to inversely correlate Islam with success in regards to millennium development goals in comparison to other religions See Njoh, Ambe J. It is increasingly true that women are negotiating their own space and are using religion instrumentally—and flexibly. You must be logged in to post a comment. Joanna R. Schacter McGill University.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must be logged in to post a comment.

Male daughters, female husbands: gender and sex in African society

It presents a subtle, honest and clear portrait of gendered roles that upsets both the usual Western assumptions about how human societies can be organized and several propagandistic treatments of gender in Africa that have been published in the intervening years. This new edition of Amadiume's magnum opus deserves to be widely read. Lorand Matory, Duke University 'Male Daughters and Female Husbands is a brilliant inspiration to open up gender theory to the originality of African philosophies of being, social life and power. Amadiume argues, from detailed evidence, that new potential emerges when we search past "suppressed and fragmented information", to find Africa's own concepts and practices of matricentricity and genderlessness, and the social history of women's movements. A book well researched, clearly written, with a good bibliography, and efficiently produced one that can be depended upon to provoke lively discussion.

We use cookies to give you the best possible experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies. Dispatched from the UK in 2 business days When will my order arrive?

These notes were contributed by members of the GradeSaver community. Critically acclaimed, it explores gender roles in Africa and poses that before European influence in colonization, African society was largely egalitarian in terms of sex. In Male Daughters, Female Husbands , Ifi Amadiume explores various aspects of pre-colonial Africa, arguing that before European and Western arrival, there were no established gender roles. She argues that colonial ways of thought reduced women from their equal statures, demeaning them to a lower role, especially economically.

Male Daughters, Female Husbands

Ifi Amadiume. London: Zed Publications, Exploring the transposition of Western mores onto West African society, Amadiume outlines a new gender reality brought on by the imposition of European Christian values on a traditionally matrilineal society. The book is based on fieldwork conducted by Amadiune in Nnobi—the Igbo area where the author hails from—in the s. As such Amadiune was not considered a stranger or outside researcher, allowing her to conduct a revealing amount of work. Her fieldwork consisted of interviews with women, out of which she constructs a systematic description of the history and social problems of the area. In particular, she suggests the initiation of debates on religion to reveal to women the positive and powerful roles in which women have played in various religions in order to arm them against those who would use religion against them. To support her thesis, Amadiume seeks to reevaluate the importance of matriarchy. She shows that gender ideologies behind sexual division of labour in Igbo society stem from their myths of origin. Yet, the goddess Idemili, the central religious deity, encouraged industriousness: the title of Ekwe was bestowed ritually upon women who created wealth through the control of others.

Amadiume, Ifi, 1947-. Male daughters, female husbands: gender and sex in an African society

Great Book. Gave me more insight on what happened out of my own home. Thank you for this book. Account Options Sign in. My library Help Advanced Book Search.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Title: Male daughters, female husbands: gender and sex in an African society. By line: Author's name as appearing in the actual publication Ifi Amadiume. Computer File. Igbo FF

Male Daughters, Female Husbands: Gender and Sex in an African Society

So much is recognizable and appealing, but it's obvious that things were different then. I first encountered the book as a graduate student within a few years of its publication, and as I began teaching African history sometime later it made regular appearances on my syllabi. Fresh and bold, Male Daughters, Female Husbands offered revelations about gender and African women's history to both Africanist scholars and Western feminists.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Meghan Trainor - Dear Future Husband

Professor Ifi Amadiume. Zed Books Ltd. In , more than a decade before the dawn of queer theory, Ifi Amadiume wrote Male Daughters, Female Husbands, to critical acclaim. This compelling and highly original book frees the subject position of 'husband' from its affiliation with men, and goes on to do the same for other masculine attributes, dislocating sex, gender and sexual orientation. Boldly arguing that the notion of gender, as constructed in Western feminist discourse, did not exist in Africa before the colonial imposition of a dichotomous understanding of sexual difference, Male Daughters, Female Husbands examines the structures in African society that enabled people to achieve power, showing that roles were not rigidly masculinized nor feminized.

Male Daughters, Female Husbands Background

.

“Male Daughters, Female Husbands: Gender and Sex in an African Society” by Ifi Amadiume explores the historical role of gender for Igbo peoples in Nigeria.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Comments: 4
  1. Vozuru

    The authoritative answer, curiously...

  2. Telar

    It not so.

  3. Vudomuro

    I join. I agree with told all above. Let's discuss this question. Here or in PM.

  4. Keshicage

    I regret, but I can help nothing. I know, you will find the correct decision. Do not despair.

Thanks! Your comment will appear after verification.
Add a comment

© 2020 Online - Advisor on specific issues.