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Why is it so hard to find a good man quotes

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: A Good Man Is Hard to Find by Flannery O'Connor - Plot Summary

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How Men Know She’s The One

A Good Man is Hard to Find Quotes

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JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Listen lady," he said in a high voice, "if I had of been there I would of known and I wouldn't be like I am now. Here it really does sound as if The Misfit does want help — he wishes he'd "been there" with Jesus.

In other words, he wishes he had real faith, because he doesn't want to be the way he is. That said, the question is whether The Misfit, as he says this, actually has the beginnings of faith, or whether this is just a wish.

The Misfit also looks uniquely vulnerable at this moment, and it's here that the grandmother's head clears, presumably because she sees that vulnerability. He's going to be into everything! Here we have an important insight into The Misfit's personality: he's curious. He's the kind of guy who asks The Big Questions.

It's the first suggestion we get that The Misfit may act the way he does because he's thought about things. Viewed in this light, he's not just a thoughtless killer. What he's thought about, rather seriously as we'll see, is religion. Been in the arm service both land and sea, at home and abroad, been twict married, been an undertaker, been with the railroads, plowed Mother Earth, been in a tornado, seen a man burnt alive oncet…" That The Misfit was a gospel singer gives some background to his past relationship to religion.

He'll also mention that his father was a member of a Baptist Church. Perhaps more important, though, is all the other things The Misfit has been. This seems to show a deep restlessness on his part. It's as if he's found nothing to be satisfied with, and is either still looking for something or has given up looking altogether.

He shown everything off balance. If He did what He said, then it's nothing for you to do but throw away everything and follow Him, and if He didn't, then it's nothing for you to do but enjoy the few minutes you got left the best way you can by killing somebody or burning down his house or doing some other meanness to him. No pleasure but meanness," he said and his voice had become almost a snarl.

The Misfit has done a lot of thinking about Jesus, and in his own way, seems to take Jesus much more seriously than the grandmother does. Everything for The Misfit boils down to whether or not Jesus was really God. If he was, then The Misfit thinks it's obvious what one should do with one's life i. If Jesus wasn't God, there's no point to life at all. According to The Misfit, there is nothing to do in that case, except take pleasure in destruction. The Misfit has chosen the latter option, because he doesn't actually believe in God.

Though it almost sounds as if he wants to believe, and is acting out of anger because he can't do so. You're one of my own children! The Misfit sprang back as if a snake had bitten him and shot her three times through the chest.

The grandmother's "moment of grace" and The Misfit's response. We've got a lot to say about this elsewhere check out "What's Up with the Ending" because it's the central moment of the story.

Is this an actual transformation in the grandmother, a product of delusion, or a last attempt at manipulation? How you see it will also influence how you see The Misfit's reaction. Any reading, though, has to make sense of the violence of the reaction.

It's as if at this moment he's encountered something very threatening, completely alien to himself, as in the "snake bite" image. What's either revealing or ironic about that image is that the snake to which the grandmother is compared is a creature often associated with evil or with being an "enemy of man" as it is in the Bible story of Adam and Eve.

Perhaps that's the way genuine good appears to genuine evil. The grandmother noticed how thin his shoulder blades were just behind his hat because she was standing up looking down on him. All she saw was the black hat wiggle between his shoulder blades. The grandmother is the first person who turns the conversation to religious territory. This transition seems a bit out of nowhere — it's the first time religion's come up in the story — and is the first inkling we get of religion on the grandmother's part.

This random introduction to religion makes the grandmother's later suggestions to pray seem superficial. Nothing else in the story has led us to think that religion is an important part of her life, and her own values have more to do with being "decent" by society's standards than with religion. It's also interesting that the grandmother is standing above The Misfit and looking down on him when she begins this conversation. It's as if she's "speaking down" to him from the perspective of her own self-righteousness.

Hiram and Bobby Lee returned from the woods and stood over the ditch, looking down at the grandmother who half sat and half lay in a puddle of blood with her legs crossed under her like a child's and her face smiling up at the cloudless sky. This last description of the grandmother does seem strangely hopeful. She's smiling, and though she's lying in a bloody heap on the ground, her legs are described as "like a child's," as if in this last moment she's regained the innocence of a child although the two actual children in the book didn't exactly have a whole lot of that.

This could suggest that the moment of grace is in fact real; the grandmother has, in some way, "resolved" her life happily. Though if you don't buy that, you could also say that she died with a faked smile on her lips.

There was nothing around her but woods. She opened and closed her mouth several times before anything came out.

Finally she found herself saying, "Jesus. Jesus," meaning, Jesus will help you, but the way she was saying it, it sounded as if she might be cursing. The grandmother appears to be in a state of shock at this point, which is understandable. She has, after all, already lost her son and grandson, her daughter-in-law, June Star, and the baby. Why does she bring up the question of Jesus? Does she use religion to get The Misfit to spare her? Or is she calling to Jesus in shock, or perhaps cursing him for letting all of this happen?

That "it sounded as if she might be cursing" suggests there's something inauthentic about her words, either because it's just a ploy, or because she doesn't believe what she's saying. The grandmother is humbled here. She both sinks down — remember that before she was standing above The Misfit — and appears to lose her own confidence in Jesus. Is this wholly because of the trauma what's just happened to her, as in "How could God let this happen? At this point, ironically, The Misfit seems to have more faith than she does.

The grandmother attempts to convince The Misfit to pray, presumably in the hopes that he'll spare her. She probably "trembles with delight" because his apparent agreement that Jesus would help him gives her hope that she can win out in the end.

The Misfit doesn't pray, because he doesn't want any help. What's interesting about this claim is that it goes against many of the other things he says. At moments The Misfit seems to be content with his life of "meanness.

This is the reversal of what the Misfit said earlier about meanness being the only pleasure in life. What he's just done — shooting the grandmother dead — merits being called "mean," yet apparently he doesn't feel good about it.

Perhaps he's fallen into complete despair, since now there's nothing left to give him pleasure. This would mean that killing the grandmother seriously affected him. Or perhaps it's the beginning of his transformation into a good man. Perhaps both. I set there and set there, trying to remember what it was I done and I ain't recalled it to this day. Oncet in a while, I would think it was coming to me, but it never come. That The Misfit literally can't remember what he did seems unlikely.

How could he forget what sent him to prison in the first place? Maybe if he were innocent and falsely accused it would make sense. However, we know from what he does and says in the story that he's far from being either. It's more likely his "not remembering" either indicates that he doesn't feel as if his past actions are wrong or doesn't take them seriously.

The Misfit commits crimes — killing people and destroying thing — because there's nothing else for him to do. He's not motivated by any desire for gain, and he doesn't believe in the concepts of right and wrong. Destruction seems to be the only thing that gives him pleasure. But you might wonder: given that he recognizes what he does to be "mean," doesn't he have some sense of right and wrong?

Could it be that it's just because something is wrong that it gives him pleasure to do it? You can do one thing or you can do another, kill a man or take a tire off his car, because sooner or later you're going to forget what it was you done and just be punished for it. Here again, The Misfit mentions "forgetting," and it doesn't seem like we can take him literally. What really makes The Misfit a bad person is that he doesn't have a sense of guilt.

He's not troubled or haunted afterwards by what he does; none of his crimes feels wrong to him. That's why he can speak of forgetting what he's done. Even if he did literally forget his crimes, perhaps after all he's committed so many he's really forgotten some , this could only happen because they don't affect him at all. They "mattered" so little that it was possible to forget them. Here someone besides the grandmother is talking about being "good," only this time it's the person who's obviously not good.

After all the grandmother said about "good people" and The Misfit himself being good, The Misfit now judges that she would have been good in the unlikely circumstance of him continuously threatening to shoot her. What does The Misfit mean when he says this?

Why Is A Good Man So Hard To Find?

Finding a good man should be a unique experience for every woman and based on her personality. You must know what "good" means to you, decide where you enjoy meeting people, and simply relax. He's out there, waiting for your natural charm, beauty and intelligence. Everyone is different, and although most people will agree that a wide-reaching handful of generic qualities like "funny," "intelligent," and "honest" are "good," who wants to be generic when you're looking for Mr.

They never have been to East Tennessee. She has to go everywhere we go.

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. For the best experience on our site, be sure to turn on Javascript in your browser. Listen lady," he said in a high voice, "if I had of been there I would of known and I wouldn't be like I am now. Here it really does sound as if The Misfit does want help — he wishes he'd "been there" with Jesus.

A Good Man is Hard to Find and Other Stories Quotes

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A Good Man Is Hard to Find

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Aug 27, - One man reveals where and how to find a good man, the man of your dreams. And guess what? It's not as hard as it sounds. Finding a good.

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