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Woman at the well reflection

Posted on March 13, Updated on March 13, Full scripture for this Sunday is available on the Catholic Ireland website. Daily Scripture is also available. Jesus came to the Samaritan town called Sychar, near the land that Jacob gave to his son Joseph. His disciples had gone into the town to buy food.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: The Story of The Samaritan Woman at the Well Explained

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Living Water and the Woman at the Well

Reflection on the Gospel: The Samaritan Woman at the Well

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls. On the surface, Jesus was naturally thirsty.

Jesus asks the woman for a drink of water. It was quite unusual for a Jewish man to speak to a Samaritan and a woman. But our Lord does so with a deeper motive. He is thirsty for water, yes, but He is also thirsty for the salvation of the Samaritan woman. We see this thirst of Jesus again when He is hanging on the cross.

Some of His last words at the crucifixion were: I thirst. Yes, Jesus was physically thirsty, but these words have deeper meaning. He is thirsty for our salvation, thirsty for our faith and our love. Mother Teresa of Calcutta often meditated on these words of Jesus from the cross.

She recognized their deeper meaning. Mother Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity. Mother Teresa wanted the sisters to meditate on these words, to realize that Jesus is thirsting for our love, our affection, our intimate attachment to Him, and our sharing of His passion.

God is thirsting for us to come forward to satiate His thirst by giving Him our love and by spreading the love of His heart. God is thirsty for souls. Jesus was thirsty for the soul of the Samaritan woman and brought her to faith. She, in the end, went forth to bring the Good News to her people. God thirsts for us. He thirsts for you and for me.

What specifically is Jesus thirsting for in us? He longs for our love, our attention, our devotion, the total entrusting of our lives to Him. We can then respond to these words by being generous with Jesus with our time, giving Him attention throughout our day, and spending time with Him in prayer. Jesus thirsts for us to surrender our lives to Him, to entrust ourselves to Him. She went every day to the well to draw water.

Yes, this was a physical necessity. But again there is something deeper here. The woman had many disappointments in her life.

Like all of us, she was thirsty for meaning in her life. She was thirsty for love. Jesus pointed out to her that she had been married five times and now was living with a sixth man. Her life-thirst was not being satisfied. She was unhappy. Man is like a traveler who, crossing the deserts of life, thirsts for the living water: gushing and fresh, capable of quenching his deep desire for light, love, beauty, and peace. We all feel this desire! And Jesus gives us this living water: He is the Holy Spirit, who proceeds from the Father and whom Jesus pours out into our hearts.

Lent is a time for us to quench our thirst, to rediscover the meaning of our life in Christ. This is a special time to encounter Jesus like the Samaritan woman at the well, and to be transformed by our encounter with Jesus, like she was.

The Lord wants to give us living water. This is why He came to earth, that we might have life and have it abundantly. Sin is an obstacle to that full life in Christ, so we have this time of Lent for our deeper conversion to the Lord. The Church invites us to drink from the living waters of the Holy Spirit. Then, like the Samaritan woman, we are no longer thirsty.

In fact, we are transformed into missionary disciples, who go forth to bring the Good News to others, like the Samaritan woman did and like Mother Teresa did, going forth then to spread the love of Christ and satiate His thirst for the salvation of souls. Bishop Kevin C. The best news. Delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to our mailing list today.

The Samaritan Woman

Augustine here reflects on the famous conversation in the Gospel of John between Jesus and the Samaritan woman who came to draw water from the well. He sees her as a symbol for the Gentiles who are called to conversion and faith and who are promised the gift of the Holy Spirit in abundance. A woman came. She is a symbol of the Church not yet made righteous.

This Samaritan woman goes to the well in the heat of the day most likely because she wanted to avoid running into others who would look on her as a tainted woman. She is surprised to encounter a man, and even more a Jewish man, who initiates a conversation with her.

The Samaritan woman at the well is a figure from the Gospel of John , in John — The woman appears in John 4 :4—42, However below is John — But he had to go through Samaria. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar , near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jacob's well was there, and Jesus, tired out by his journey, was sitting by the well.

Woman at the Well: A Story of a Loving God

In an article first published in The Irish Catholic, Brendan Comerford finds lenten inspiration in the Gospel story of the Samaritan woman at the well outside Sychar. I can never resist the temptation to do so since the Gospel reading for The Third Sunday of Lent, Year A, is the marvellous story of Jesus meeting the Samaritan woman at the well John If someone were to ask you what is your image of Jesus, what would you say? When I think about that question in times of prayer, I invariably come back to this scene of Jesus with this woman. I find something very human about a Jesus who is literally exhausted from walking and most likely ministering to the crowds. This is a Jesus who is dusty, perspiring, hungry and thirsty, maybe in need of some personal space from his disciples. This is our God! How close the Christian God is to our own very human experience! This is curious in itself.

3rd Sunday of Lent: Woman At The Well

Throughout the gospels in the New Testament, there are many stories about encounters between Jesus and seemingly random people. I often study these scriptures and sometimes, commentaries in an attempt to extract meaning from these brief exchanges. One of the encounters is between Jesus and a Samaritan woman, who is often referred to as the woman at the well. The disciples seem to have disappeared for a while and so Jesus goes to the well by himself to get a drink of water. There he encounters a woman with whom he has an unusual conversation.

During the six weeks of Lent , Bishop Donal McKeown invites us, as individuals, as families and parish faith communities of the Diocese of Derry, to use the six Sunday Gospels of Lent to look at the life of service to which God is calling all of us, as the disciples of Jesus.

The story of the woman at the well is one of the most well known in the Bible; many Christians can easily tell a summary of it. On its surface, the story chronicles ethnic prejudice and a woman shunned by her community. But take look deeper, and you'll realize it reveals a great deal about Jesus' character. Above all, the story, which unfolds in John , suggests that Jesus is a loving and accepting God, and we should follow his example.

Faith reflections: Women at the well

This Sunday, the Third Sunday of Lent, we will hear in the Gospel the story of the encounter and conversation of Jesus and the Samaritan woman at the well. I invite you to think about the thirst of Jesus and the thirst of the woman in the Gospel, representing also our thirst, the thirst of our souls. On the surface, Jesus was naturally thirsty.

Question: "What can we learn from the woman at the well? This was an extraordinary woman. She was a Samaritan , a race of people that the Jews utterly despised as having no claim on their God, and she was an outcast and looked down upon by her own people. However, this woman was ostracized and marked as immoral, an unmarried woman living openly with the sixth in a series of men. The story of the woman at the well teaches us that God loves us in spite of our bankrupt lives.

In Truth and Charity: The woman at the well

Beginning the Journey for new Christians. Wilson's Books Donations Sitemap 8. Ralph F. Michael Dudash, "Living Water. Permission requested.

Jacob's well is there and Jesus, tired by the journey, sat straight down by the well. It was about the sixth hour When a Samaritan woman came to draw water.

This reflection on John considers how Jesus values the people scorned by others, in this instance a Samaritan Woman. So he came to a Samaritan city called Sychar, near the plot of ground that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. It was about noon. Where do you get that living water? The water that I will give will become in them a spring of water gushing up to eternal life.

Gospel Reflection

Imagine yourself as the woman in this passage. Jesus approaches you and tries to reveal his thirst to you—perhaps his thirst for intimacy with you—but you put him off. You are not worthy. When he offers to satisfy your thirst, you put him off.

From a talk given at St. Jesus came to a town of Samaria called Sychar, near the plot of land that Jacob had given to his son Joseph. Jesus, tired from his journey, sat down there at the well.

Jump to navigation. If we go to school to the Samaritan woman at the well, what lessons can we learn for women in the church today?

Barely two months after graduating from college, I boarded a plane and landed in The Gambia, West Africa, to begin my service as a Peace Corps volunteer. I found myself in a new land, with a new language, new customs and new food. I saw her in the village, women who worked day in and day out feeding and caring for their children and families; cleaning, cooking and working the fields. Women who laughed and cried with one another. Women who shared their burdens and joys.

What makes this world so lovely is that somewhere it hides a well. I think it comes at a perfect time as after a few weeks of our Lenten journey, we are certainly in need of a well! She is a Samaritan, a race of people the Jews utterly despise as having no claim on their God…and she is also an outcast, one who is looked down upon by her own people. She comes alone in the heat of the day to draw water from the community well. This is unusual as drawing water and chatting at the well early in the day is the social highpoint for most other women.

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